top graphic
top graphic Picture of clouds top graphic

HOME| ABOUT| PHOTOS| MEMBERSHIP| LEGISLATIVE| CALENDAR | CONTACT| LINKS

XXXXXXXXXXX&&&&&&&&&&&+++++++++.jpeg
Welcome

Welcome to the web home of Putnam County Fish and Game Association. We are a private, non-profit sporting organization based in Putnam County,NY.

Normal business hours are the General Membership meetings on the first Friday
of the month at 8:00 P.M.and the Board of Directors meeting on the last Friday of the month at 7:30 P.M.

Updates

2015 Nominations - Click here

The BOD is still accepting snowplow bids until their next meeting - 10/31/14

PCFGA Topographic Map

OCT - DEC '14 Newsletter

REVISED Range Orientation

REVISED Range SOP

On This Day in History

Oct 8, 1918:

U.S. soldier Alvin York displays heroics at Argonne

Corporal Alvin C. York kills over 20 German soldiers and captures an additional 132 at the head of a small detachment in the Argonne Forest near the Meuse River in France. The exploits later earned York the Congressional Medal of Honor.

York and his battalion were given the task of seizing German-held positions across a valley, the small group of 17 men were fired upon by a German machine-gun nest at the top of a nearby hill. The gunners cut down nine men, including a superior officer, leaving York in charge of the squadron.

As York wrote in his diary: "Those machine guns were spitting fire and cutting down the undergrowth all around me something awful…. I didn’t have time to dodge behind a tree or dive into the brush, I didn’t even have time to kneel or lie down…. As soon as the machine guns opened fire on me, I began to exchange shots with them. In order to sight me or to swing their machine guns on me, the Germans had to show their heads above the trench, and every time I saw a head I just touched it off.

Several other American soldiers followed York’s lead and began firing; as they drew closer to the machine-gun nest, the German commander—thinking he had underestimated the size of the enemy squadron—surrendered his garrison of some 90 men. On the way back to the Allied lines, York and his squad took more prisoners, for a total of 132.


HOME| ABOUT| PHOTOS| MEMBERSHIP| LEGISLATIVE| CALENDAR| CONTACT| LINKS

bottom graphic